Friday, 8 June 2018

Necromunda Underhive Zone Mortalis terrain - pt.1

Shortly after the release of the new Necromunda Underhive, a company called Deathray Designs produced an mdf set of walls/corridors to use on the boards called Deadbolt's Derelict.

I managed to get a set during last years Black Friday sales at a cheaper price, shipping was insane though. But it' is a very nice set and I really wanted that claustrophobic feel to my Necromunda tunnel fighting.

I've been working on the kit a little here and there between other projects and they were finally fully constructed recently and waiting for the paint queue:

These are the corner columns with the holes that anchor all the walls together.

The single wall sections, notice the hooks that lock into the columns above.

The double wall sections, with all sorts of industrial detailing.

I actually broke the very the very last piece I was removing from the frames, it was the only one that didn't separate easily out of the entire set. I'll just hide the damage with a load of rust texture.

I've kept all the refuse from the frames, thought they might come in handy for detailing any scratch built terrain in the future.

I've only had experience working with MDF terrain kits once before. And that just so happened to also be some Necromunda terrain that I made for a local games club.

I remember the MDF being very thirsty on paint and soaking it up like a sponge. I got some advice in the comments back then about sealing the terrain first with a P.V.A/water mix.

But there are an awful lot of fine lines and detail on these kits and I didn't know if the glue mix might fill some of the said detail. So I thought I'd experiment with satin varnish to seal the pieces before priming:

I use this brand of varnish through my airbrush regularly with no problem whatsoever, so I thought I'd give it a try.

First coat of varnish on the pieces upside down to get under the details so I don't miss anywhere.


I'm just letting that first coat dry while I write this, so I can flip them over and give them all a coat from the top.

Once I've made a bit more headway and got the primer down, I'll update and report how the varnish worked as a sealer.

Well... Looks like everything is almost dry now, so going to get back to it.

Until next time, take care.

2 comments:

  1. Would be interested to hear about how varnish takes as a sealant. I tried the hairspray soaking method and it still drank endless paint. Have you seen the salt weathering method? Seems like it could be appropriate for underhive terrain

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    Replies
    1. I have heard of the salt weathering method and was wondering about using it. But I've also got some chipping medium on hand I've been wanting to try out too. Not sure exactly which I'll be going with yet.

      I'm adding some texture to the recesses right now for rust/grime build-up. Once that is dry proper priming will commence and we'll see how well the varnish worked.

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Comments and critiques are always welcome.